Philippines apologise for killing of Taiwanese fisherman

May 16, 2013
Reset Text smaller larger

TAIPEI, Taiwan – President Benigno Aquino apologised on Wednesday (May 15th) for the coastguard's killing of a Taiwanese fisherman last week, apparently aimed at containing growing Taiwanese anger, AFP reported.

  • 130516-POTD_SEA_APOLOGY_PP  Taiwanese foreign minister David Lin (right) and Philippine envoy Antonio Basilio listen during a press conference at Taiwan's Foreign Ministry Wednesday (May 15th). Philippine President Benigno Aquino has apologised for the killing of a Taiwanese fisherman. [Sam Yeh/AFP]

    130516-POTD_SEA_APOLOGY_PP Taiwanese foreign minister David Lin (right) and Philippine envoy Antonio Basilio listen during a press conference at Taiwan's Foreign Ministry Wednesday (May 15th). Philippine President Benigno Aquino has apologised for the killing of a Taiwanese fisherman. [Sam Yeh/AFP]

Filipino coastguard personnel shot the fisherman, who they said had illegally entered Philippine waters.

Early Wednesday, Taiwan had suspended the hiring of Filipino workers and threatened more retribution. In response, Aquino sent an envoy, the chairman of the Manila Economic and Cultural Office, which handles relations with Taiwan, to the island to act as his "personal representative" and apologise.

"(He) will convey his and the Filipino people's deep regret and apology to the family of Mr Hung Shih-cheng, as well as to the people of Taiwan over the unfortunate and unintended loss of life," presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda said in Manila.

Add A Comment (Comments Policy)* denotes required field

Apdf-en_gb

Poll

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) does not represent Muslims.

View Results

Photo Essay


Worshippers read from the Qur'an at Jakarta's Istiqlal Grand Mosque on May 4th, as part of "One Day One Juz", a programme that encourages Muslims to live by Islam's holy book. More than 90% of Indonesia's 250 million people are moderate Muslims. [Adek Berry/AFP]

Hardliners threaten tolerance in Indonesia

Indonesia's tradition of moderate, tolerant Islam is under threat by hard-line groups who are imposing their conservative views on others and intimidating religious minorities.